CPK (Presbyterian Community of Kinshasa) Health Clinics

Child with malaria holding an ice bag.

Child with malaria holding an ice bag.

DR Congo

Overview

  • Total Clinics staff – 105
  • Prenatal Visits – 2,019
  • Under 5 Visits – 2,562
  • Maternity Deliveries – 2,520
  • Curative Outpatient Visits – 12,120

Target Areas for Sustainable Impact

  • Improve patient outcomes through training for CPK staff and doctors
  • Reduce mortality rates by increasing access for malaria and maternity patients unable to pay for services
  • Increase quality patient care by ensuring a stable and adequate supply of medicine and supplies

The Presbyterian Community of Kinshasa (CPK) is a Presbyterian partner church in the metropolitan area of Kinshasa, DR Congo. Originally, the CPK focus was toward education, but they expanded into healthcare services and now operate seven health centers in the populous city of Kinshasa, mainly serving the urban poor population.

The health centers offer outpatient services including laboratory services, maternity service, immunizations, and primary healthcare services such as malaria treatment. There is a doctor in each health center paid through patient fees.

The facilities are located in crowded areas with poor road access, making it difficult for ambulances to access homes in cases of emergencies. This has necessitated the centers to undertake C-section deliveries. Six of the centers provide C-section deliveries.

The seven CPK clinics are as follows:

  • Maternite Boo Nsuba
  • Maternite Liboke
  • Maternite Centenaire
  • Maternite Mayamba
  • Maternite Tshisuaka
  • Maternite Tshimungu
  • Centre Feminin Mudishi

The biggest challenge for CPK health centers is coping with the demand for services from a growing population. Patients are requesting expansion of services to minimize referrals. There is an increased demand for services that the health centers cannot currently provide, such as minor surgeries. A day surgery suite at the Tshisuaka Clinic is under consideration.

The clinics receive some government support for tuberculosis, immunization and HIV/AIDS programs. They have access to good supply of medical consumables and drugs in the city of Kinshasa, but need financial assistance to purchase supplies and medicines.